Inside Gear

Posted on July 16, 2014

 

 

01:

Cabela's E.C.W.C.S Thermal Zone Polartec Power Dry Zip Top is unlike any other base layer you've worn. It uses three-types of fabrics to provide total comfort in a variety of temperatures and activities. You've got to wear it to believe it.

Cabela’s E.C.W.C.S Thermal Zone Polartec Power Dry Zip Top is unlike any other base layer you’ve worn. It uses three-types of fabrics to provide total comfort in a variety of temperatures and activities. You’ve got to wear it to believe it.

Versatile Base Layers

Early last year, I was sent a new thermal top from Cabela’s. The design was truly different with various fabric weights sewn together. It seemed a little gimmicky to me at first, but as I wore the garment in a variety of field environments and temperatures, the concept began to prove its effectiveness over and over.

Unlike an ordinary thin-to-mid weight-type thermal top, this one kept me warmer and drier during colder mornings. Yet, later in the day, as temps continued to rise, it still felt cool and comfortable, even during moments of high activity. I was truly impressed

Cabela’s calls this unique fabric technology “thermal zone” and has created this product to go along with their extensive E.C.W.C.S. program garment line. The fabric weights are strategically placed in body-mapped areas to provide the ultimate in thermal regulation. The heaviest “polar weight” is used in core and maximum-exposed areas to provide optimal heat retention for the most critical zones. The “mid-weight” fabric is employed in less critical areas that still receive substantial exposure. The lightest “tech weight” is located in high-heat-output areas that are prone to excessive perspiration, as well as the cuff areas to minimize bunching that can cause discomfort and reduced circulation to the extremities.

In addition to this, the top’s thermal-regulating dual-surface Polartec Power Dry fabric wicks moisture to the surface for quick-drying action. The top also has antimicrobial treatment to keep it fresher between washes.

To learn more or to buy this product, log onto www.cabelas.com, “Hunting Clothing,” and then “Base Layers.” — Joe Bell, Editor

 

02:

The Third-Axis Leveling Device by Hamskea Archery Solutions was designed to simplify the difficulty of leveling your bowsight for second- and third-axis capability.

The Third-Axis Leveling Device by Hamskea Archery Solutions was designed to simplify the difficulty of leveling your bowsight for second- and third-axis capability.

Precision Made Easy

Your average bowhunter knows very little about “leveling” a bowsight, but for maximum accuracy, especially on long-range shots, a well-leveled sight is key.

Most quality bowsights come with a second-axis level bubble, usually pre-set at the factory. This provides suitable accuracy for most hunting applications when aiming on a slope. However, when shooting up or downhill, third-axis leveling capability is necessary to ensure a dead-on hit.

More and more of today’s sights (usually top-end versions) are third-axis adjustable, which is good. However, leveling the third-axis feature can be a nightmare. In the past, the best way to do this was to find a rock quarry or deep canyon and shoot at a 45-degree downward angle, firing several groups of arrows and adjusting the third-axis feature until your shots hit in the middle. Obviously, this process was difficult and time-consuming and most archers failed to do it well.

Then came the Hamskea Third Axis Level device, which is a handy device that mounts to your bow’s sight window, without hurting the riser’s finish. It effectively allows you to level the sight to your bow, for both second and third-axis.

To adjust the sight’s second axis, simply clamp on the Hamskea Level Device on the flattest surface within the bow’s sight window (somewhere along the riser) and then hold the bow upright and steady. (You can attach the bow to a vise or simply rest the bottom cam on a bench or table.) From here, steady the bow until the Level Device bubbles in the middle, and then adjust the bowsight’s level to do the same. This will accurately set the sight’s second-axis feature.

For third axis, you’ll need to find a straight, vertical line (edge of door, wall, etc.) or make one of your own by using a leveling device (or plumb line) and trace a line somewhere on the wall or a sheet of cardboard.

Next, draw the bow (using your release or fingers tab) and aim at a severe down or upward angle (45 degrees or more), and use the Level Device’s alignment pin and settle it straight up and down on this line. Then look at the bubble and how it reads, and then make the necessary adjustments to center it up.

 

Note: The reason for drawing the bow is important, because many bows when drawn back will have a shift in third-axis, and measuring the axis at full draw will allow you to compensate for this static to full-draw change.

 

Not all bowhunting sights use the same method of adjusting third-axis. Some sights use apertures that adjust in/out (toward or away from you), while other sights use a bubble level that can move in/out. Both systems work well.

However, for sights without third-axis capability, you can still level it by loosening the sight’s mounting plate and taking a thin sheet of plastic or feeler gauge material to “shim” in out, effectively positioning the sight housing more inward along the sight window. This will, after some trial and error of using different thicknesses of shims, bring the bubble to center for true third-axis leveling. It works surprisingly well.

I know— a whole lot of information to take in. But to be accurate, you must level your sight properly, and this is why you owe it to yourself to check out this great archery product.  Visit www.hamskeaarchery.com. —Joe Bell, Editor

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